Gilbert, AZ Health Insurance

Gilbert, AZ Health Insurance is a unique health care insurance marketplace. By simply entering your presonal zip code into our health insurance database, you are able to find the major health care providers in your area. Then you can compare as many as you'd like to find the best price for just the right amount of coverage.

What is the best way to save money on health insurance' Compare health insurance quotes from multiple companies with Health Insurance Quotes! Health Insurance works with the country’s largest health insurance provides to provide you with quotes online. Just enter your zip code above and we will provide you with a list of local providers that can get you your quotes in minutes.

Healthcare and health insurance costs are high, you can begin lowering your costs by using our providers. If you’d like to learn more about health insurance before signing up, you can visit the Affordable Care Act website at www.healthcare.gov. There are many resources to read and help you make informed decisions. If you already know and are ready to purchase medical insurance, then enter your zip code to find out how you can save on health insurance.

How do you find the best health insurance rates and the best coverage' Let health insurance quotes help you. Just select as many carriers or companies as you would like to compare to find the right plan for you.
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 Finding the Lowest Health Insurance Rates in Gilbert

Saving money on health insurance begins with you. You know better than anyone if you are in good health or if a family member may have a pre-existing condition. By knowing this you can help determine the kind of coverage you and/or your family needs. Only you know what you are willing to spend on medical insurance. Please read below to see what types of insurance plans fit your needs, HMO (Health Maintenance Organization), PPO (Preferred Provider Organization), HDHP (High Deductible), or Catastrophic Health Insurance. They all have their benefits and advantages. It’s just a matter of finding the right fit for you. HMO’s are usually less expensive than PPO’s, although with HMO’s you are usually required to stay in the network of doctors. With PPO’s you may pay a little more but have many choices in your health care providers.

Determining the right medical coverage for you depends on your own assessment of your health. If you tend to be active and lead a healthy lifestyle, you may consider a High Deductible plan or HMO. Or, you may need health insurance only for major medical events, in which a Catastrophic plan may be your perfect match. Typically, the higher you’re deductible the less you pay, just like your car insurance. (Which we also provide, just select auto insurance from the drop down menu after you complete your health insurance quotes…).  You can also save money by not purchasing health insurance coverage’s or prescriptions that you don’t need.

Be considerate of your current situation as well as the near future. Some things change and need to be considered, such as possibly needing maternity coverage if you’re planning on having children soon or maybe your son or daughter is going to begin after school sports, such as football or cheerleading. The best plan is to be prepared for anything while not paying too much for things you don’t need. Hospital bills are known by everyone to usually seem excessively large and can be financially overwhelming. Having the right health insurance plan can help you in your most desperate times and protect your assets from large medical bills. Don’t put you or your family’s financial future in jeopardy.

See how we can save you money today on your health insurance. Get a free, online health insurance quote today. Just start with your zip code.

 Understanding your Health Insurance Needs

Finding health insurance for you can be overwhelming, but trying to be certain that you find the right insurance for your family can be a priority for you. Don’t do it alone. Researching health insurance online one website at a time can take weeks to get all the information you need. Our service helps you by placing all your local insurance providers in one convenient location and allows you to compare as many quotes and policies as you would like. Don’t pay too much for health insurance for you or your family, get free, online health insurance quotes from Health Insurance.

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 Different Kinds of Gilbert Health Insurance Plans

Different types of health insurance plans meet different needs. When you compare options, it's important to understand how they are structured.

Health Maintenance Organizations (HMOs) and Exclusive Provider Organizations (EPOs)
HMOs and EPOs may limit coverage to providers inside their networks. A network is a list of doctors, hospitals, and other health care providers that provide medical care to members of a specific health plan. If you use a doctor or facility that isn't in the HMO’s network, you may have to pay the full cost of the services provided. HMO members usually have a primary care doctor and must get referrals to see specialists. This is generally not true for EPOs.  

Preferred Provider Organizations (PPOs) and Point-of-Service plans (POS)

These insurance plans give you a choice of getting care within or outside of a provider network. With PPO or POS plans, you may use out-of- network providers and facilities, but you’ll have to pay more than if you use in-network ones. If you have a PPO plan, you can visit any doctor without a referral. If you have a POS plan, you can visit any in-network provider without a referral, but you’ll need one to visit a provider out-of-network.  

High Deductible Health Plan (HDHP)

High Deductible Health Plans typically feature lower premiums and higher deductibles than traditional insurance plans. As of 2013, HDHPs are plans with a minimum deductible of $1250 per year for individual coverage and $2500 for family coverage. If you have an HDHP, you can use a health savings account or a health reimbursement arrangement to pay for qualified out-of-pocket medical costs. This can lower the amount of federal tax you owe.

Catastrophic Health Insurance Plan
A catastrophic health insurance plan covers essential health benefits but has a very high deductible. This means it provides a kind of "safety net" coverage in case you have an accident or serious illness. Catastrophic plans usually do not provide coverage for services like prescription drugs or shots. Premiums for catastrophic plans may be lower than traditional health insurance plans, but deductibles are usually much higher. This means you must pay thousands of dollars out-of-pocket before full coverage kicks in. In the Marketplace, catastrophic plans are available only to people under 30 and to some low-income people who are exempt from paying the fee because other insurance is considered unaffordable or because they have received "hardship exemptions". Marketplace catastrophic plans cover 3 annual primary care visits and preventive services at no cost. After the deductible is met, they cover the same set of essential health benefits that other Marketplace plans offer. People with catastrophic plans are not eligible for lower costs on their monthly premiums or out-of-pocket costs.

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Health Insurance Terms

Advanced Premium Tax Credit
A tax credit that can help you afford coverage bought through the Marketplace. Sometimes known as APTC, “advance payments of the premium tax credit,” or premium tax credit. Unlike tax credits you claim when you file your taxes, these tax credits can be used right away to lower your monthly premium payments.
Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP)
Insurance program jointly funded by state and federal government that provides health coverage to low-income children and, in some states, pregnant women in families who earn too much income to qualify for Medicaid but can’t afford to purchase private health insurance coverage.
Co-insurance
Your share of the costs of a covered health care service, calculated as a percent (for example, 20%) of the allowed amount for the service. You pay co-insurance plus any deductibles you owe. For example, if the allowed amount for an office visit is $100 and you've met your deductible, your co-insurance payment of 20% would be $20. The health insurance or plan pays the rest of the allowed amount.
Co-payment
A fixed amount (for example, $15) you pay for a covered health care service, usually when you receive the service. The amount can vary by the type of covered health care service.
Cost Sharing
The share of costs covered by your insurance that you pay out of your own pocket. This generally includes deductibles, co-insurance, and co-payments, but it doesn't include premiums, balance billing amounts for non-network providers, or the cost of non-covered services.
Deductible
The amount you owe for eligible health care services before your health insurance or plan begins to pay. For example, if your deductible is $1000, your plan won't pay anything until you've met your $1000 deductible for covered health care services subject to the deductible. The deductible may not apply to all services.
Health Insurance Marketplace (Exchange)
A resource where individuals, families, and small businesses can: learn about their health coverage options; compare health insurance plans based on costs, benefits, and other important features; choose a plan; and enroll in coverage. The Marketplace also provides information on programs that help people with low to moderate income and resources pay for coverage. In some states, the Marketplace is run by the state. In others it is run by the federal government.
Health Savings Account (HSA)
A medical savings account available to taxpayers who are enrolled in a qualified High Deductible Health Plan. The funds contributed to the account aren't subject to federal income tax at the time of deposit (subject to limits). Funds must be used to pay for qualified medical expenses.
High-Deductible Health Plan
A plan that features higher deductibles than traditional insurance plans. High deductible health plans can be paired with a health savings account to allow you to pay for qualified out-of-pocket medical expenses on a pre-tax basis.
Medicaid
A state-administered health insurance program for low-income families and children, pregnant women, the elderly, people with disabilities, and in some states, other adults. The Federal government provides a portion of the funding for Medicaid and sets guidelines for the program. States also have choices in how they design their program, so Medicaid varies state by state and may have a different name in your state.
Medicare
A Federal health insurance program for people who are age 65 or older and certain younger people with disabilities. It also covers people with End-Stage Renal Disease (permanent kidney failure requiring dialysis or a transplant, sometimes called ESRD).
Navigator
An individual or organization that's trained and able to help consumers, small businesses, and their employees as they look for health coverage options through the Marketplace, including completing eligibility and enrollment forms. These individuals and organizations are required to be unbiased. Their services are free to consumers.
Network
The facilities, providers and suppliers your health insurer or plan has contracted with to provide health care services.
Open Enrollment Period
The period of time during which individuals who are eligible to enroll in a Qualified Health Plan can enroll in a plan in the Marketplace.
Out-of-pocket Maximum (OOPM)
The most you pay during a policy period (usually a calendar year) before your health insurance or plan starts to pay 100% for covered health benefits. This limit must include deductibles, co-insurance, co-payments, or similar charges and any other expenditure required of an individual which is a qualified medical expense for the health benefits.
Premium
A set fee you pay (monthly, quarterly or annually) to keep your insurance going.
Premium Tax Credit
Financial help you may qualify for when buying health insurance on your state’s marketplace. Also called a “subsidy,” this credit is claimed when you file taxes (unless it’s an “advanced premium tax credit").
Preventive Services
Routine health care that includes screenings, check-ups, and patient counseling to prevent illnesses, disease, or other health problems.
Primary Care Provider (PCP)
A physician (M.D. – Medical Doctor or D.O. – Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine), nurse practitioner, clinical nurse specialist or physician assistant, as allowed under state law, who provides, coordinates or helps a patient access a range of health care services.
Qualified Health Plan
An insurance plan that is certified by the Health Insurance Marketplace, provides essential health benefits, follows established limits on cost-sharing (like deductibles, copayments, and out-of-pocket maximum amounts), and meets other requirements. A qualified health plan will have a certification by each Marketplace in which it is sold.
Qualifying Life Event
A major life change (defined by the IRS) that allows you to make changes to your insurance plan: marriage, divorce, birth of a child, etc.
Special Enrollment Period
A time outside of the open enrollment period during which you and your family have a right to sign up for health coverage. In the Marketplace, you qualify for a special enrollment period 60 days following certain life events that involve a change in family status (for example, marriage or birth of a child) or loss of other health coverage.
Specialist
A physician specialist focuses on a specific area of medicine or a group of patients to diagnose, manage, prevent or treat certain types of symptoms and conditions.
Urgent Care
Care for an illness, injury or condition serious enough that a reasonable person would seek care right away, but not so severe it requires emergency room care.